CHELSEA – Chelsea Football Club Old Crest

Since the club’s foundation, Chelsea have had four main crests, though all underwent minor variations. In 1905, Chelsea adopted as their first crest the image of a Chelsea pensioner, which contributed to the ‘pensioner’ nickname, and remained for the next half-century, though it never appeared on the shirts. As part of Ted Drake’s modernisation of the club from 1952 onwards, he insisted that the pensioner badge be removed from the match day programme to change the club’s image and that a new crest be adopted. As a stop-gap, a temporary emblem comprising simply the initials C.F.C. was adopted for one year. In 1953, Chelsea’s crest was changed to an upright blue lion looking backwards and holding a staff, which was to endure for the next three decades. This crest was based on elements in the coat of arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Chelsea with the ‘lion rampant regardant’ taken from the arms of then club president Viscount Chelsea and the staff from the Abbots of Westminster, former Lords of the Manor of Chelsea. It also featured three red roses, to represent England, and two footballs. This was the first club badge to appear on shirts, since the policy of putting the crest on the shirts was only adopted in the early 1960s.

Features

  • Coin Alloy Name: Alpaca 12
  • Coin Alloy Color: silver
  • Coin Diameter: 31
  • Coin Thickness: 2,25
  • Coin Edge: serrated, fine
  • City: CHELSEA
  • Country: United Kingdom
  • Available: yes
  • Location: CHELSEA, United Kingdom